A couple months ago I taught myself how to use Pinterest (better late than never) and instantly became addicted. In fact, I already pinned close to 2,000 inspiring images, articles, recipes and DIYs to all my boards and completed five of my fav findings from the site. Winter tends to make people–including myself–a little restless, and there really is no better cure for cabin fever than working on a few beautiful and functional do-it-yourself projects.

As I continue to explore Pinterest, I will most definitely be updating this list a few times over. I cannot wait to get started on some of the stunning makeup tutorials the site has to offer. But for now, the following are the five best DIYs to hit my feed. Be sure to follow my boards for instant updates!

Coconut-rose body scrub is almost too pretty to use! I love displaying mine on the bathroom counter in a simple ceramic bowl.

Coconut-rose body scrubNot only does this body scrub smell amazing, it is 100 percent natural AND it actually works. Coconut oil moisturizes skin, while pink Himalayan salt exfoliates, leaving my entire bod feeling smooth and silky. In addition to the hydration and salt your skin craves, this scrub includes rose oil, which tones and tightens skin, reducing the appearance of scars and stretch marks. As with all beauty products that contain coconut oil, you should only make this scrub with organic, extra virgin coconut oil–otherwise, you’ll end up with clogged pores and breakouts.

Hair-thickening mask: This is another all-natural beauty product–can you tell I have a type? I don’t always take the greatest care of my mane, so it has definitely thinned out over the last couple years. Coconut oil is my go-to hair treatment once a week when I have time to pamper myself, but I wanted to see what else the world of Pinterest had to offer my tresses.

I quickly discovered this 10-minute thickening mask that combines castor oil, coconut oil and honey. In addition to promoting hair growth, this mask also leaves hair feeling soft and looking shiny. And, after I did a little research, I discovered that castor oil, its main ingredient, also promotes eyebrow and eyelash growth. What more could a gal want?

Cereal box organizersOver the years I’ve accumulated a ton of magazines and journals, making this DIY a must-do for me. As my collection grows over the years, I will definitely be recreating variations of this project–this link alone offers 15 different ways to turn cereal boxes into perfect space-saving storage containers for magazines, journals, folders and books.

Brass hoop earrings with suede laceSo, this one isn’t technically a DIY (it’s a link to an Etsy shop), but instead of purchasing these earrings, I decided to make my own. A quick trip to AC Moore for some brass hoops and suede lace was all it took to create a super unique pair of statement earrings.

These babies may seem like pricey vintage jewelry (aka my motif), but in reality I made them in half an hour and for under $20. I absolutely love pairing them with a plain white t-shirt and blue jeans for a casual, yet polished daytime or weekend look.

Cucumber-avocado smoothieI am a total sucker for a green smoothie, and this recipe offers a unique spin on the usual spinach/kale blends. Don’t get me wrong, spinach and kale smoothies are great, but sometimes I need a change. Enter: the cucumber-avocado smoothie.

The base ingredients, i.e., cucumber and avocado, combine to create a creamy, yet refreshing texture, while lime and cilantro give the smoothie a zesty twist, making it the perfect micronutrient-rich post-gym or afternoon pick-me-up. I will definitely be adding this recipe to my weekly wellness regimen. For an extra nutrition boost, I may try adding a cup of spinach–which is virtually tasteless in smoothies–to the smoothie the next time I whip it up.

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Last month famed French fashion house Louis Vuitton debuted its highly anticipated collaboration with streetwear brand Supreme. The high fashion label–which is known predominantly for its signature luggage–included six handbags, a backpack, a messenger bag and a holdall in its Fall/Winter 2017 collaborative menswear collection with the Manhattan-based subculture clothier.

Streetwear staples like denim baseball jerseys, jackets and scarves, emblazoned with a mix of Louis Vuitton and Supreme logos, turned heads as they casually made their way down the catwalk, according to fashionista.com.

Other noteworthy garments included oversized sweaters, sport coats and trousers, as well as clean-looking sneakers, eye-catching keychains and various styles of outerwear. As it is a fall/winter collection, many of the looks featured several layers of both solid and printed pieces, in fresh, muted hues. Pops of candy apple red and bright white added a youthful vibe that did not overpower an otherwise neutral color palette.

While the fashion show itself took place in Paris, Vogue claims it was a “celebration of the style of New York in all its artistic, eclectic, sybaritic, and liberated variousness” that was “inspired by the artists and parties that have shone brightly in the city…crammed with elegantly expressed underground references.”

In other words, Louis Vuitton’s quality craftsmanship and timelessness took the form Supreme’s alternative style–and vice versa–without a single comprise to either brands’ distinct aesthetic. Think: Parisian artistry with a New York attitude.

Also extremely popular over the past several months is Vêtements’ Thrasher hoodie, a hybrid of another French luxury brand and a San Francisco-based skater magazine. In terms of entirely collaborative collections, however, Vêtements worked with Champion to design high fashion sweats and activewear. Ranging in price from $540 to $810 on NET-A-PORTER, it is safe to say these pieces are meant to be worn anywhere but the gym.

In addition to buzz-worthiness (high fashion/streetwear collabs are big this year!), Louis Vuitton x Supreme has plenty of longevity. For one reason, it’s actually wearable. Runway styles often get a bad rap for being impractical, but Louis Vuitton x Supreme is the complete opposite. It maintains street style ease and comfort without jeopardizing a luxurious, high fashion feel.

The collection also draws in a ton of attention from teens and young adults, who typically favor streetwear over high fashion. If runway designers want to remain relevant in a society consumed by fast fashion, collaborating with streetwear brands may be the way to go.

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Admittedly, I am way more into secondhand shopping and thrifting than I’m into hitting the mall. Recently, I picked up a few major scores, and thanks to Poshmark, I was able to find a vegan suede fringe jacket–for $20, nonetheless. While I was on the hunt for a camel moto jacket, I spotted this Western-inspired piece and decided it would make a stylish alternative to a biker one. After all, I already own a black moto jacket, so why not change things up a bit?

I was instantly able to think up a ton of cute outfits with pieces already in my closet. From this season’s must-have bodysuit-and-mom-jeans combo to a smokin’ hot “athleisure” getup, the possibilities are virtually endless when it comes to styling this gorgeous statement jacket.

On this particular day, however, I decided to play it safe with gray and black underneath; in my opinion gray, black and tan look really elegant together, so this outfit was totally a match made in heaven for me. A simple, soft v-neck allows a lacy bralette to peek through, while high-waist skinny jeans and sock booties give the look a sleeker vibe.

Vegan suede jacket with fringe, thrifted, $20

Bralette, Free People, $38

Easy Jeans, American Apparel, $78

Sock booties (not pictured), Topshop, $70

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New media (including blogs) and social media (think: Instagram, Snapchat) without a doubt have a huge impact on the fashion industry. From the way we read magazines to who’s sitting front row at the hottest fashion shows, a lot has changed in tandem with new media’s rise–and not all of it is for the better, either.

Many industry professionals and fashion gurus yearn for the days when fashion was about art, talent and innovation; instead, they are left with a bleak world based on ads, sales and consumerism. This phenomenon affects not only the way the world sees the industry, but the scope of the industry itself, in six distinct ways.

Depp and Lagerfeld on the Chanel Couture Spring 2017 runway on January 24 [source: popsugar.com.au]

Nepotism: Nepotism is prevalent in just about every facet of the fashion industry, but it is most obvious when it comes to models, both on the runway and in print. World class designers, such as Chanel’s creative director Karl Lagerfeld, tend to favor the children of celebrities over models who have made a name in the industry for themselves. Bella Hadid (daughter of Yolanda Hadid and David Foster), Kendall Jenner (daughter of Kris Kardashian and Bruce Jenner) and Lily Rose Depp (daughter of singer-songwriter Vanessa Paradis and actor Johnny Depp) all served as Lagerfeld’s muse on the Chanel runway during the recent Spring 2017 couture show in Paris. Depp, 17, who closed the show in an ornate tulle gown, even walked arm-in-arm with Lagerfeld as she descended down the runway. Additionally, other celebrity children, like Bella Hadid’s older sister Gigi, and Hailey Baldwin, daughter of actor Stephen Baldwin, appear on numerous runways and print ads every season, causing traditional–and arguably more talented–models to be pushed aside.

Pay-for-play on the red carpet: Per The Fashion Law, celebrity stylists and their A-list clientele receive large sums of money from designers seeking red carpet recognition. With award show season in full-swing, these stylists receive “anywhere between $30,000 and $50,000” per event, while the celebrities themselves can receive upwards of $100,000, according to Jessica Paster, who has dressed Cate Blanchett, Emily Blunt, Miranda Kerr, Sandra Bullock and Rachel McAdams, among others. But, American lawyer and voice behind The Fashion Law Julie Zerbo does not take these so-called “ambassadorships” between designers and celebrities lightly. In fact, she states, “…it is important for advertising brands to think critically about whether a connection between the product (a dress or necklace, for instance) and its endorser (the celebrity) is material; whether consumers would understand that that endorser has been compensated for his or her endorsement; and whether a material connection disclosure needs to be made and how.” Furthermore, “…endorsements that have come about as a result of a connection between the endorser and the underlying brand without proper disclosure are violations of the FTC Act,” according to Zerbo, while “a misrepresentation is ‘material’ if it is likely to affect consumers’ buying choices.”

[source: harpersbazaar.com]

Lack of innovation in design: While the most coveted designs were once the intricate, handmade ones that took hours upon hours to assemble and often had to be custom ordered, that is no longer the case. As exhibited by Dior’s Spring 2017 ready-to-wear collection, the most popular pieces are now synonymous with the most Instagram-able ones. A simple white t-shirt reading “WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS” stole the show, made subsequent headlines, flooded social media feeds all over the world and gained even more esteem when it was worn by superstars Natalie Portman and Rihanna rocked it off the runway. A similar t-shirt by Gucci, which retails for nearly $600, came to fame on the backs (literally!) of several bloggers and Instagram influencers–We Wore What’s Danielle Bernstein and newcomer Alicia Roddy, to name a few–who’ve worn it throughout the past few months, as well.

The democratization of fashion: The fashion industry, which used to be comprised of elites, is more accessible than ever. Thanks to fast fashion, more and more people are able to participate in runway trends at the expense of sweatshop workers in developing countries, as well as the global environment. Bloggers and social media influencers post snapshots and videos from their front row seats at the hottest fashion shows, while magazines such as Vogue publish free online content for all to read, increasing the demand for fast fashion. As fast fashion’s popularity grows, the malignant practice becomes a societal norm, and writers promote it as a positive while ignoring the ugly truth. Similarly, high end designers seem to be in a never-ending worldwide competition to create the most buzz-worthy clothes, which has caused an extreme decrease in the quality and innovation of their work over the last five years.

Fashion shows that are no longer about the fashion: Instead of attending shows to actually see the designs, industry insiders (and outsiders!) seek invitations so that they can be photographed in the front row or spotted outside. The front row was once reserved for Anna Wintour (Editor-in-Chief of Vogue) and company; now reality stars such as Kim Kardashian-West and big name bloggers such as Chiara Ferragni of the Blonde Salad sit front row for the likes of Tommy Hilfiger and Jeremy Scott–some even sit alongside Wintour and co. They come to shows toting their smart phones in order to post photos of designs almost as instantly as they debut. At a given fashion show, followers can count on a handful of bloggers and influencers to Snapchat the entire event. Some big name designers, such as CÉLINE and Tom Ford, have tried presenting collections strictly to buyers and editors in order to combat this problem.

Gross violation of FTC regulations: Gross violation of Federal Trade Commission regulations is undoubtedly the most widespread dilemma currently facing the fashion industry. Countless bloggers, YouTube stars and social media influencers fail to disclose sponsored content on their respective platforms, misleading millions of consumers regularly–in fact, it seems there is a new culprit every week or so. In an attempt to come off as more authentic to their thousands, and sometimes millions, of followers, bloggers such as Natalie Suarez (known throughout the blogosphere as Natalie Off Duty) and Aimee Song (Song of Style) intentionally fail to disclose content paid for by fashion and beauty brands such Lord & Taylor and Laura Mercier, according to Zerbo. Influencers like the Kardashians and Jenners have also come under fire for posting misleading social media content sponsored by brands such as Balmain, Calvin Klein, Inc., Estée Lauder, Inc., Karl Lagerfeld™, MANGO, Mint Swim, MISBHV, Puma, Revlon (for Sinful Colors) and Roberto Cavalli S. P. A., according to Zerbo. While some bloggers and influencers occasionally include a #spon or #sp to their posts, it is often hidden in the middle or the end of a wordy caption. An FTC-approved disclosure, according to Zerbo, includes #ad or Ad: (not #spon or #sp) at the beginning, and video posts call for disclosure to be said out loud or displayed on screen early on.

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Skinny scarves are having a major moment this season, and to be 100 percent honest, I am completely here for it. I used to think I was all about chunky knit scarves and plaid blanket scarves, but style stars like Lou Doillon completely changed the way I see the accessory. Because I wear a ton of black, white and gray, I purchased a tan skinny scarf from Revolve last month; so far I absolutely love the texture this suede piece brings to basics like shirt dresses and silky pajama tops (another huge trend this season)!

Lou Doillon for Rockins [source: Instagram user @rockinshq]

On this reasonably mild January day I decided to pair the skinny scarf with a crisp white shirt dress, gray ribbed tights and black leather sock booties, this season’s It shoe. This look was perfect for a long day on campus; it is simple and clean, yet stylish and modern. All the pieces are versatile and somewhat plain, but they create an effortlessly chic model-off-duty ensemble when they come together.

I definitely plan on styling this look with fishnets and heeled booties (and maybe a little cleavage!) for a night out. As soon as I ditch the skinny scarf and let my hair out of its top knot, this outfit can definitely go from classroom to cocktails. For daytime, however, I find it is much better to forgo the flashy accessories and choose something slightly more modest. While a sultry, smoky eye and flirty nude lips would suit this look in the evening, minimal makeup is definitely the move during daylight hours.

Shirt dress, thrifted

Skinny scarf, Revolve

Ribbed tights, American Apparel, no longer available

Sock booties, Topshop

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